English 9 poetry: Sonnets

This post is due by the time your class meets on Tuesday, 21 April. Thank you to the students who posted earlier.

One of the most enduring poetic forms, the sonnet—a fourteen-line lyric poem about a single topic, with strict rules for meter and rhyme—was popularized by an Italian named Petrarch in the 1300’s. Later, English poets modified its rules a bit, and the English or Shakespearean sonnet was born. Both versions remain popular today in a variety of languages, although the strict rules that defined sonnets when they first became popular are often modified or wholly abandoned by modern poets.

Read the four sonnets below, and then complete the following items as a reply to this post. Note: though not required, any analytic comments you make about the sonnets’ meter, based on our work from Wednesday in class, will be much appreciated.

  1. Comment on the differences between the modern and traditional sonnets. Which style do you find more effective or compelling?
  2. Consider the two Shakespearean sonnets: what is their central difference? Which do you prefer? Why?
  3. Of the four sonnets, which did you find most effective? Why? Give at least two examples directly from the sonnet. (This may be the same sonnet you chose for #2 if you like, but your comments should be different or, at least, more developed.)
  4. Finally, choose a third sonnet that you like from one of the sources below, and comment on its effectiveness, using at least two specific examples. Please paste your sonnet into your response, or as a comment on your response.

all of Shakespeare’s sonnets / famous sonnets / more varied and modern selection (note that some of those on this last link can only be considered sonnets by very liberal standards—for your selection, try to stick with those that have only 14 lines, or close to 14 lines with a rhyming couplet at the end)

(scored with a weight-of-2 grade in standards 5 & 6)

Shakespeare: Sonnet 18 
Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate:
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer’s lease hath all too short a date;
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimm’d;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance or nature’s changing course untrimm’d;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade,
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow’st;
Nor shall death brag thou wander’st in his shade,
When in eternal lines to time thou grow’st:
   So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,
   So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.

 

Shakespeare: Sonnet 130
My mistress’ eyes are nothing like the sun;
Coral is far more red than her lips’ red;
If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun;
If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head.
I have seen roses damasked, red and white,
But no such roses see I in her cheeks;
And in some perfumes is there more delight
Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks.
I love to hear her speak, yet well I know
That music hath a far more pleasing sound;
I grant I never saw a goddess go;
My mistress, when she walks, treads on the ground.
   And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare
   As any she belied with false compare.

 

e.e. cummings: being to timelessness as it’s to time

being to timelessness as it’s to time,
love did no more begin than love will end;
where nothing is to breathe to stroll to swim
love is the air the ocean and the land

(do lovers suffer? all divinities
proudly descending put on deathful flesh:
are lovers glad? only their smallest joy’s
a universe emerging from a wish)

love is the voice under all silences,
the hope which has no opposite in fear;
the strength so strong mere force is feebleness:
the truth more first than sun more last than star

—do lovers love? why then to heaven with hell.
Whatever sages say and fools, all’s well

Claude McKay: America
Although she feeds me bread of bitterness,
And sinks into my throat her tiger’s tooth,
Stealing my breath of life, I will confess
I love this cultured hell that tests my youth.
Her vigor flows like tides into my blood,
Giving me strength erect against her hate,
Her bigness sweeps my being like a flood.
Yet, as a rebel fronts a king in state,
I stand within her walls with not a shred
Of terror, malice, not a word of jeer.
Darkly I gaze into the days ahead,
And see her might and granite wonders there,
Beneath the touch of Time’s unerring hand,
Like priceless treasures sinking in the sand.

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34 Responses to English 9 poetry: Sonnets

  1. 18joyp says:

    The traditional ones use more rhymes than the modern, but both have rhythm all the way through. I like traditional sonnets more. The rhymes make it for me more poem like, and easier to understand.

    Both sonnets talk about the woman Shakespeare loves, but the way he shows his affection is different. In the first poem, Shakespeare talks about how beautiful his girl is and he demonstrates his great love for her, immortalizing her in this sonnet; while in the second poem, he tells her how she is not the perfect nor eternal summer day, that she doesn’t have to be it, that she is as perfect as any other normal human. I prefer the sonnet 18, it seems more fit for a love poem. Or at least, if anyone recited me a love poem, I’d feel better is I was called pretty than wire haired and that my mouth reeks disgustingly… Yeah, I like more the idea of being a pretty sunny day.

    I liked sonnet 18, because of the simplicity and the sweet words. It compares the girl to a summer’s day, and then eventually says how she is better. How a summer day has flaws, but she doesn’t. The words that he uses are easy for me to understand and sound very poetic, more than if he had used even more straight forward words. “Sometimes too hot the eye of heaven shines,” describing the sun, portraying it as the eye of heaven, or “And every fair from fair sometimes declines,” which means that even beauty has an end; also they rhyme.

    The sonnet I chose is Sonnet 12, the reasons being; it’s my favorite number, I understood it (after several attempts), and I like it’s message. It talks about beauty and how it fades, it never really lasts, comparing one to green and beautiful green crop that shows it’s beauty until it’s harvested: “And summer’s green all girded up in sheaves”. It says that beauty may fade, and the only way to escape Time’s scythe is by having children: “And nothing ‘gainst Time’s scythe can make defence /
    Save breed to brave him, when he takes thee hence.”.

    SONNET 12:
    When I do count the clock that tells the time,
    And see the brave day sunk in hideous night,
    When I behold the violet past prime,
    And sable curls all silvered o’er with white:
    When lofty trees I see barren of leaves,
    Which erst from heat did canopy the herd
    And summer’s green all girded up in sheaves
    Borne on the bier with white and bristly beard:
    Then of thy beauty do I question make
    That thou among the wastes of time must go,
    Since sweets and beauties do themselves forsake,
    And die as fast as they see others grow,
    And nothing ‘gainst Time’s scythe can make defence
    Save breed to brave him, when he takes thee hence.

    • 18hugoo says:

      1.The difference between the modern and traditional sonnets is clearly the kind of words that are used in both different styles. The language that is used in traditional sonnets is definitely harder to understand for the reader because this kind of language is old English. The shakespeare’s words are totally complex and interesting. Also I can notice that the traditional sonnets has a better structure because for me it was easier to understand this style thanks to the order of the words. Obviously the words used by Shakespeare are like more poetic and are indicated for the kind of poetry.
      Talking about the rhymes, the traditional sonnets more specific in the 18 the rhyme is clearly and so rmonic to the reader. This kind of rhythm make me have more interest of what’s going on because it is very funny and dynamic (keep the reader entertaining).

      2.I think that the central difference between both styles is that the traditional sonnets are more specific, entertaining, dynamic and definitely has a better words to describe the main idea of the poem. In my opinion the main difference is the kind of words that Shakespeare used in his poems than the modern authors because the words of the traditional sonnets are more complex, elegant and striking.
      3.My favourite sonnet was the traditional one, the sonnet 130. I liked this sonnet because it is easy to understand, a kind of funny, dynamic and difficult to understand meaning of the poem. The poem lets me thinking about the real meaning of the poem. I have to say that I didn’t understand many words because they are very old words, but in general the language was very complex and dynamic (the poem keeps me entertained). “Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks.” and “ My mistress’ eyes are nothing like the sun”
      4. Do not stand at my grave and weep by Mary Elizabeth Frye
      Do not stand at my grave and weep:
      I am not there; I do not sleep.
      I am a thousand winds that blow,
      I am the diamond glints on snow,
      I am the sun on ripened grain,
      I am the gentle autumn rain.
      When you awaken in the morning’s hush
      I am the swift uplifting rush
      Of quiet birds in circling flight.
      I am the soft star shine at night.
      Do not stand at my grave and cry:
      I am not there; I did not die.

      Actually I don’t understand the real meaning of the poem, I understand this poem line by line but not the full context. The style of Mary Elizabeth Frye is pretty good and complicated to understand the meaning of the whole context. Also the author used a rhyme making this poem more dynamic and interesting. In general words Mary Elizabeth Frye used a lot of Rhyme and personification. As final result, she got a interesting ,consistent, clear and a good poem

  2. 18marianap says:

    1) The modern sonnets use punctuation in a more ambiguous way, whereas traditional sonnets in the examples use punctuation in a more strict manner. Other difference is that modern sonnets does not make a consistent use of rhymes, in comparison the Shakespearean sonnets uses the continuous and consistent use of rhymes and in each end of a verse writers use rhymes. In my opinion I prefer the traditional poems because you can create your own understanding about the poem, you never know the real meaning, besides in the modern poems you can know since the beginning what really means.

    2) In the first sonnet 18 Shakespeare portraits romanticism, he describes his love to a woman, focus on her qualities and comes up exaggerating a little. He describes a perfect girl and emphasizes the outer beauty. Unlike the other poem, Shakespeare already creates something more realistic, talks about all the defects of a woman, describes her in a bad sense, but still in love with her even with all her defects. I personally like both poems, but I prefer the sonnet 130, because for me is more truthful. Shakespeare wrote something different. Almost all love poems describe a perfect love, perfect woman, who even does not seem real. I think with this poem he was able to show a different and more realistic side.

    3) I found more effective the sonnet 130, because I like the way he uses objects from the nature to describe the woman he loves, for example in this verse: “My mistress’ eyes are nothing like the sun; / Coral is far more red than her lips’ red;” he uses sun and coral to compare the woman, which is also metaphor. Other verse that caught my attention is when he admits to love her voice but the sound of music is better: “I love to hear her speak, yet well I know /That music hath a far more pleasing sound;”. In this sonnet I think the major point is to list her defect that are superficial and focus in her inner beauty, her personality that made him fall in love.

    4) SONNET 116
    “Let me not to the marriage of true minds
    Admit impediments. Love is not love
    Which alters when it alteration finds,
    Or bends with the remover to remove:
    O no; it is an ever-fixed mark,
    That looks on tempests, and is never shaken;
    It is the star to every wandering bark,
    Whose worth’s unknown, although his height be taken.
    Love’s not Time’s fool, though rosy lips and cheeks
    Within his bending sickle’s compass come;
    Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks,
    But bears it out even to the edge of doom.
    If this be error and upon me proved,
    I never writ, nor no man ever loved.”
    I chose this sonnet because I like the way he speaks about love, that love can give you strength to go through difficulties, also it gives a contradictory definition of love but says that to be in love is worth it.

  3. valerybmv says:

    1.Modern and traditional sonnets are very different since modern sonnets are more about what is happening to the world and don’t have much order, on the other hand traditional sonnets are more romantic and have a more formal structure to it. I find traditional sonnets for affective and compelling because of how they are written and their structure.

    I really like Sonnet 18. Since now a days it’s really difficult to find a guy which can write romantic poetry. Sonnet 18 is very romantic and not really really realistic. Instead Sonnet 130 is very direct and very normal ( as a person) he says that there is no point to tell someone that their eyes are as bright as the suns because it’s not true. Even though it’s very true I prefer Sonnet 18 because now a days it’s rare for someone to write like that.
    I really like Sonnet 18 because it’s very romantic even though it’s kind of a “fantasy” to have “ Eyes like the sun”.
    I love this poem:

    Do not stand at my grave and weep
    by Mary Elizabeth Frye

    Do not stand at my grave and weep:
    I am not there; I do not sleep.
    I am a thousand winds that blow,
    I am the diamond glints on snow,
    I am the sun on ripened grain,
    I am the gentle autumn rain.
    When you awaken in the morning’s hush
    I am the swift uplifting rush
    Of quiet birds in circling flight.
    I am the soft starshine at night.
    Do not stand at my grave and cry:
    I am not there; I did not die.

    I really admire the poets that make the last word rhyme with the next one because you can see how much effort they put into the poem. You can see that they didn’t just write it down like a normal story they put all their effort and there skills into it.

  4. 18matheusm says:

    1. I find the old sonnets more attractive and more engaging than the new ones. Furthermore I feel that the Shakespeare sonnets are fancier and more elegant. My favorite poem was Sonnet 130 by Shakespeare; I love how Shakespeare always finds beautiful metaphors to express his amazing feelings towards beauty.

    2. The first Shakespeare’s sonnet describes how as long as people can read his sonnet he will never die and people will always praise his literauture. The Sonnet 130 talks about how he falls in love with his mistress even though he doesn’t think she is the most pretty he still loves her for who she is.I like it because it shows how love is blind and how love goes far beyond the beauty outside of the individual.

    3. One of the things that really cathed my attention in sonnet 130 was how Shkespeare shows irony by saying “I love to hear her speak, yet well I know/That music hath a far more pleasing sound/” He says she sounds beautiful but there are more beautiful things to listen thsn her voice, that is very weird wy describe ove and to be romantic. He also brings beautiful imagery into his sonnet which makes the image of her mistress easier for the reader to comprehend.

    • 18matheusm says:

      4. Sonnet 116
      Let me not to the marriage of true minds
      Admit impediments, love is not love
      Which alters when it alteration finds,
      Or bends with the remover to remove.
      O no, it is an ever-fixed mark
      That looks on tempests and is never shaken;
      It is the star to every wand’ring bark,
      Whose worth’s unknown, although his height be taken.
      Love’s not Time’s fool, though rosy lips and cheeks
      Within his bending sickle’s compass come,
      Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks,
      But bears it out even to the edge of doom:
      If this be error and upon me proved,
      I never writ, nor no man ever loved

      I loved this Sonnet because Shakespeare dexcribes love as something that cannot be broken, is like a spell that lasts for ever, He makes me think of Harry Potter’s scar when he says, “O no, it is an ever-fixed mark/”. I love the end were he were he said, “If this be error and upon me proved/I never writ/ nor no man ever loved” made him sound certain of what he was saying. That if he was wrong no man had ever loved, making him sound very brainy.

  5. 18manuelg says:

    I enjoyed reading the Shakespearean sonnets. As I red the sonnets, I noticed that it had juicy and catchy diction. Compared to the new ones, Shakespeare always finds a way to make his sonnets fancier and more elegant. He uses metaphor, simile and visual imagery in his sonnets to engage the reader and to make his sonnets more detailed.

    The two Shakespeare sonnets are different from each other. Sonnet 18 is describes how as long as humans read his sonnet, his legate will never die and how his literature will never vanish. Instead, sonnet 130 is about his love towards his mistress and how no matter how she looks like, he will always love her no matter what. He uses different forms of writing to make the readers understand better what he is trying to express.

    My favorite sonnet was sonnet 130. For me, it is the best one because he expressed his feelings and how he described that no matter how she looks, what matters is the feeling you have for her. Shakespeare used metaphors and visual imagery to engage the reader. I love the complex diction he uses. What I understood from reading the poem is that he knows she is not the most beautiful woman but that his feelings towards her are the only thing that matters. At the end, I noticed that he says “As any she belied with false compare.” I believe that he might be saying that “False compare” means that his comparisons are false, that she is the most beautiful woman in the world in his point of view.

    Claude McKay: America
    Although she feeds me bread of bitterness,
    And sinks into my throat her tiger’s tooth,
    Stealing my breath of life, I will confess
    I love this cultured hell that tests my youth.
    Her vigor flows like tides into my blood,
    Giving me strength erect against her hate,
    Her bigness sweeps my being like a flood.
    Yet, as a rebel fronts a king in state,
    I stand within her walls with not a shred
    Of terror, malice, not a word of jeer.
    Darkly I gaze into the days ahead,
    And see her might and granite wonders there,
    Beneath the touch of Time’s unerring hand,
    Like priceless treasures sinking in the sand.

    I enjoyed reading this sonnet. Even tough I never got the bigger picture of it, I could imagine what she was saying in my head, I could picture in my head what she was describing. The poem is talking about USA with very vivid diction. The author uses personification really well to let the readers know what she is trying to express.

  6. 18oscarp says:

    Both Shakespearian sonnets were majestic. As always, Shakespeare puts such passion and life into his work. My favorite was Sonnet 130, because of its little complexity. Many would argue that he was making fun of his wife, but I would say otherwise. In my point of view he was saying that no matter to what he describes his wife, she still surpasses the beauty of those materialistic things. Her cheeks are not like roses, because her cheeks are her’s, and they are beautiful just as they are. Sonnet 18 is lacking (in my opinion) that spark that Shakespeare gives. Im not saying its not good, it indeed is amazing, but its to stereotypic of him (if you understand what I mean).
    I really enjoyed reading all of these sonnets, though my favorite must be “Being to Timelessness as is to Time” by e.e cummings. His style is very compelling not only because of the meaning of the sonnet, but because of how he separates them into different paragraphs. Im not sure why I enjoy this type of style, yet it still compelled me. He is saying that no one has ever or will ever, truly, define the true meaning of love. Love is so complex, and thats why I like this sonnet, it shows the complexity of love. “Love is the voice under all silences,/ the hope which has no opposite in fear;”. He is explaining that love is the link between two opposites, its unexplainable, yet we still try our hardest to understand it instead of just letting it be.
    I enjoyed all of the sonnets I read but “Do not stand at my grave and weep” by by Mary Elizabeth Frye stood out to me the most. Maybe its because of its simple complexity, or because I liked that it rhymed. I love the idea that she puts in our mind, that after death we are still alive. I believe she does this by the use of rhyme throughout the poem, which made it sound more nursery rhyme like. And also her use of repetition of the word “I am” appealed more to me. I do believe that what she says is true, after we die we leave a corpse indeed, but WE are NOT THERE. We are everywhere. I believe this is true because we are always there, with that person, in there memory. Wherever they are, we will be there, in their mind, as a distant memory, either wanting to be remembered, or waiting to be forgotten.

    Do not stand at my grave and weep
    by Mary Elizabeth Frye

    Do not stand at my grave and weep:
    I am not there; I do not sleep.
    I am a thousand winds that blow,
    I am the diamond glints on snow,
    I am the sun on ripened grain,
    I am the gentle autumn rain.
    When you awaken in the morning’s hush
    I am the swift uplifting rush
    Of quiet birds in circling flight.
    I am the soft starshine at night.
    Do not stand at my grave and cry:
    I am not there; I did not die

  7. 18mateom says:

    Modern poems use more accessible language for us and are easier to understand an comprehend. Shakespeare’s poems use more complex diction and seems to choose his words more carefully than both authors of modern poems. I prefer the Shakespearean poems because I really like to think about what he is trying to say through all the complex language and literary devices.
    The most noticeable difference between the two Shakespeare poems is that the former speaks about his love for someone, and the latter is about how ordinary her mistress is. I really like the second sonnet as it’s a satire of the traditional use of sonnets. Shakespeare is saying that no women can be as beautiful as those described in sonnets. He is saying that her mistress is ordinary, but that he loves her ever so.
    Sonnet 130 was by far my favorite of all the poems as it expressed love and beauty with such darkness and raw honesty. This is much more appealing than just hearing the typical cliches that she was as white as snow or her hair was gold like the sun. Instead he tells us how ordinary she is and how “[her] mistress’ eyes are nothing like the sun”. However he then says, “And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare/As any she belied with false compare.” Here we realize that he doesn’t care if she is perfect or whatever, but that he loves her with all her flaws.

    Sonnet 129 is a very appealing poem due to its dark roots and inspiration. The poem uses lots of enumeration to list the qualities about lust, which are mostly, or completely abhorrent according to the narrator. He calls lust things like “murderous” or “full of blame” to show this view towards lust. Furthermore, the narrator claims that we should “shun the heaven that leads men to his hell”. The diction of people that appropriate as the choice of words help keep a positive reading considering the dark themes. in the other poem.

    • 18mateom says:

      The expense of spirit in a waste of shame
      Is lust in action; and till action, lust
      Is perjured, murderous, bloody, full of blame,
      Savage, extreme, rude, cruel, not to trust,
      Enjoy’d no sooner but despised straight,
      Past reason hunted, and no sooner had
      Past reason hated, as a swallow’d bait
      On purpose laid to make the taker mad;
      Mad in pursuit and in possession so;
      Had, having, and in quest to have, extreme;
      A bliss in proof, and proved, a very woe;
      Before, a joy proposed; behind, a dream.
      All this the world well knows; yet none knows well
      To shun the heaven that leads men to this hell.

  8. 18ethelr says:

    I personally happen to enjoy the older sonnets best. I simply think that the language and rhyme and meter is more appealing and pleasant to read. Even though you could say it’s slightly cheesy, my favourite of all was sonnet 18. I simply like how it reads even though it’s not necessarily a dark poem. I think that the second shakespeare sonnet about the mistress is also good because it conveys slightly controversial ideas in very unexpected and reckless ways. I personally felt a little uncomfortable reading! Again, the sonnet that is most effective for me is sonnet 18.It is probably lines like these “Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,And often is his gold complexion dimmed;” that really pain pictures in your mind and evoke feelings. I think that even though it may not be the darkest or complex sonnet ever, it’s appealing. I also enjoy looking at the lines “Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow’st;
    Nor shall death brag thou wander’st in his shade,
    When in eternal lines to time thou grow’st:”
    I love the contrast in diction and really vivid literary devices like the personification of death bragging. The lines that really

    I think this was one of the best memorable jeanie patty. I ssssssssss it incredibly effective because of how goodness yet interesting it sounds.

    • 18ethelr says:

      Sorry Ms. Barga, I cropped the post accidentally. The central difference between the two Shakespearean poems, I think, lies on the ideas. The whole idea of having a poem that actually isn’t praising beauty rather than making it seem ordinary is strange. The rhyming is much more consonant on the second one, and the language simpler.
      I picked this poem:
      “Sonnet XXIX”
      When in disgrace with Fortune and men’s eyes,
      I all alone beweep my outcast state,
      And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries,
      And look upon myself and curse my fate,
      Wishing me like to one more rich in hope,
      Featured like him, like him with friends possessed,
      Desiring this man’s art and that man’s scope,
      With what I most enjoy contented least,
      Yet in these thoughts my self almost despising,
      Haply I think on thee, and then my state,
      (Like to the lark at break of day arising
      From sullen earth) sings hymns at heaven’s gate,
      For thy sweet love remembered such wealth brings,
      That then I scorn to change my state with kings.

      I chose this one because I enjoyed the language and ideas. I love that there are many ways you can interpret it. There are great lines like
      From sullen earth) sings hymns at heaven’s gate,

  9. Angelica Ray says:

    I felt that the traditional sonnets were far more effective than the modern ones, mostly because the traditional sonnets have a more fluid rhythm and rhyme. Poems, in my opinion, should flow in a smooth pattern as you read through it because it creates more of an effect and poetic feeling. Plus the traditional sonnets have more mystery to it whereas the modern sonnets are more straightforward with less perspective.

    Shakespeare’s sonnet 18 was all about comparing his love to a summers day because of how a summers day comes and goes but never loses its beauty just like his love though she is gone, while in Shakespeare’s sonnet 130 he says practically the opposite. Instead he criticizes his love, saying she is nothing close to beautiful, yet that’s why he loves her. I felt that Shakespeare’s sonnet 130 was more affective because of that and had a deeper meaning to it. He looked past her outer appearance and looked deeper than what is seen to the human eye, “And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare”.

    Of all four sonnets, I thought Shakespeare: sonnet 130 was the most effective. This is because I found it humorous but meaningful at the same time. It’s funny and ironic how honest Shakespeare is about the appearance of his love considering when you love someone you usually rave about how beautiful and stunning they are but instead he does the opposite and says things like, “As any she belied with false compare”. It’s not until the very end where he says, “And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare,” and he admits that she, the women he speaks of, is his love”. At that point you realize, at least in my opinion, that the whole point of what he is trying to say is that he looks past her appearance and loves her for bigger, better reasons, such as her personality.

    “London, 1802” is a poem written after the death of a famous poet, Milton. The poem is depressing and makes the reader realize how tragic the death of Milton was and just how important and meaningful his poems were for certain people. As you can see while reading the poem, many people believed Milton made a difference in England with his poems, “thou hadst a voice whose sound was like the sea;” and after his death there was a lack of civility in England. The first line, “Milton! Thou shouldst be living at this hour”, straight out expresses the poets longing for him. Throughout the entire poem the poet exaggerates how lost the world is without him for example, “Thy soul was like a star, and dwelt apart”, to give emphasis to Milton’s importance.

    “London, 1802”
    Milton! thou shouldst be living at this hour:
    England hath need of thee: she is a fen
    Of stagnant waters: altar, sword, and pen,
    Fireside, the heroic wealth of hall and bower,
    Have forfeited their ancient English dower
    Of inward happiness. We are selfish men;
    Oh! raise us up, return to us again;
    And give us manners, virtue, freedom, power.
    Thy soul was like a Star, and dwelt apart;
    Thou hadst a voice whose sound was like the sea:
    Pure as the naked heavens, majestic, free,
    So didst thou travel on life’s common way,
    In cheerful godliness; and yet thy heart
    The lowliest duties on herself did lay.

  10. 21EDUITA21 says:

    The type of poem that I like the most is the traditional one. The traditional one is more effective due to it’s peculiar words that force the reader to focus more on the meaning of the words. The traditional poem “hooks” the reader by the means of it’s ancient words.

    The two Shakespearian poems are different. The first one is about love. This love of the first poem describes the loved person as a perfect woman/man. On the other hand, the second poem is about love too, but it is a servant-boss type of love with the servant describing how horrible her boss was; Yet he still loves her.

    The most effective poem was the first one. The poem is forced in the beginning, but as it continues it becomes more melodious. The first line “Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day” sounds forced and it is saying that in those times a radiant summer’s day was one of the most beautiful things on the earth. Now days people don’t consider a summer’s day so beautiful due to the climate changes and the rising temperatures. The poem then gets in the rhythm and sounds much better than the beginning. This poem has a powerful start and a romantic ending.

    The first sonnet written by shakespeare sounds like someone is complementing a person that is of higher social economical class than him. One of the poem’s complements is “But thou contracted to thine own bright eyes” meaning that the person is saying that with money that person can make his(her) eyes shine. It is suggesting that power is everything. It is effective since now days people say “Money is not everything” and in this sonnet it is saying the opposite of that. it may be because the lower class person is complementing the high class one.

    Shakespeare’s sonnet #1:
    “From fairest creatures we desire increase,
    That thereby beauty’s rose might never die,
    But as the riper should by time decease,
    His tender heir might bear his memory:
    But thou contracted to thine own bright eyes,
    Feed’st thy light’s flame with self-substantial fuel,
    Making a famine where abundance lies,
    Thy self thy foe, to thy sweet self too cruel:
    Thou that art now the world’s fresh ornament,
    And only herald to the gaudy spring,
    Within thine own bud buriest thy content,
    And tender churl mak’st waste in niggarding:
    Pity the world, or else this glutton be,
    To eat the world’s due, by the grave and thee,”

  11. Carlota says:

    1. There are a lot of differences between the modern sonnets and Shakespeare’s ones, the most notable difference is the language. I believe that the language Shakespeare uses makes the sonnet more effective and likable. Although modern sonnets are easier to understand, in my opinion traditional sonnets are more compelling. I think that the language used in traditional sonnets makes it look more interesting and better.

    2. The two Shakespeare sonnets are very different from each other, one talks about how beauty is everything and the other one how beauty is not important when it comes to love. I liked both of them very much, but in my opinion I connected more with Shakespeare’s sonnet 130. I liked how this sonnet describes how love is not just about physical appearance. Although they both give visual imagery and also a metaphor to the reader, I liked the meaning that sonnet 130 gives.

    3. I found that the most effective one, for me, was Shakespeare’s sonnet 130. I like how at the end he says “I think my love as rare”, this makes me think about how many people feel that love is only about physical appearance, thats why Shakespeare feels that his love is rare because is not about appearance. He uses a lot of metaphoric language and simile in this sonnet, like for example how he compares her lips or eyes like less than coral or the sun. This sonnet had a very positive effect on me and I liked it a lot.

    4. Do not stand at my grave and weep:
    I am not there; I do not sleep.
    I am a thousand winds that blow,
    I am the diamond glints on snow,
    I am the sun on ripened grain,
    I am the gentle autumn rain.
    When you awaken in the morning’s hush
    I am the swift uplifting rush
    Of quiet birds in circling flight.
    I am the soft starshine at night.
    Do not stand at my grave and cry:
    I am not there; I did not die.
    I really liked the sonnet that Mary Elizabeth Frye wrote, called “Do not stand at my grave and weep”. I have listened to this sonnet many times before, but didn’t really think about it until today. Grief has always been hard on people and I believe that this sonnet gives the reader a way to be more open minded about death. This poem gives the reader many ways to feel about grief and also it has many literary devices in it, like metaphor, visual imagery and others. I liked the last two lines a lot, they had the most effect on me because of how she makes the readers reflect on them.

  12. 18teresaf says:

    In my opinion, the main different between the modern sonnets and the traditional sonnets is the language, Shakespeare sonnets have a older and more complex language which makes it difficult to understand. I prefer the the traditional sonnets because I feel they are more deep than the modern, I also feel that traditional sonnets are more modern. Nevertheless, I find modern sonnets easier to understand and to read as the diction is not so complicated.

    I liked both Sonnets a lot, but I preferred ‘Shakespeare: Sonnet 130’ as I find the main idea more interesting. Sonnet 130 is about a love to a woman which isn’t perfect, but he still loves her with her defects, while Sonnet 18 only talks about the beauty of the woman he loves.

    I found Sonnet 130 the most effective, I liked this sonnet more, because it is different, the other poems talk about love and perfection. ”I love to hear her speak, yet well I know // That music hath a far more pleasing sound;’’ I like this quote in particular as he says that he loves how she speaks, but then changes and says that it is better listening to music, my saying this I think he shows that he loves her although she is not perfect. ‘And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare // As any she belied with false compare.’ This are the two last lines of the poem, in which he says that he loves a among everything.

    Do not stand at my grave and weep
    by Mary Elizabeth Frye

    Do not stand at my grave and weep:
    I am not there; I do not sleep.
    I am a thousand winds that blow,
    I am the diamond glints on snow,
    I am the sun on ripened grain,
    I am the gentle autumn rain.
    When you awaken in the morning’s hush
    I am the swift uplifting rush
    Of quiet birds in circling flight.
    I am the soft starshine at night.
    Do not stand at my grave and cry:
    I am not there; I did not die.

    I liked a lot Mary Elizabeth Frye poem as it was simple and easy to read, but has a deep topic, about the death. I liked the line in which she used repetition ”Do not stand at my grave and weep:’’ as it made me think about the little sense of going to someones grave to cry or to pray as then it states ”I am a thousand winds that blow,’’ I think that this line means that he is dead and that nothing is going to change that.

  13. 18brunab says:

    1. The difference between the traditional and the modern is the way they express their feeling in the poem. Shakespeare’s rhymes in his poems are more complex because of the ABAB rhyming pattern. In the e.e cumming poem this rhyming practically does not exist. In the Claude McKay poem, he uses this rhyming, but not often, not how Shakespeare does. Also, Shakespeare expresses more his feelings. When I started reading his two sonnets, I had an idea of what he was trying to say, but at the end I realized that the idea of the poem was completely different from the one I was thinking at the beginning. In the modern poems I knew what the poems were about since the beginning until the end. I liked more Shakespeare sonnets because of the feelings that are transmitted. This style makes people wonder and reflect about it.

    2. The biggest difference is the contrast. In sonnet 18, the speaker talks specifically of a person’s beauty with some of its defects. The speaker uses comparison in both sonnets, but in the sonnet 18 he compares specifically the person to a summer day. Otherwise, in the sonnet 130 he compares the person with everything, nothing in specific. This sonnet (130) shows more contrast because he describes the person in a not attractive way. Because of this contrast, I liked it better than sonnet 18.

    3. I think sonnet 130 was more effective because the speaker is more ironic and unexpected, which I really like. We do not know what he is going to say at the end because it is very different from the beginning. When he keeps saying those bad things of this woman, I thought he would never change his thoughts and that he would just keep saying those kind of things. But everything changes just at the last two sentences of the sonnet. This is what I most liked about it, this unexpectation; just two sentences can change everything that you were expecting, just like the speaker did. These two lines were the ones that I most liked: “My mistress, when she walks, treads on the ground./And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare.” This was when the speaker made the readers think about it in another way; going from talking ill about someone to praising that person.

    4.
    When to the sessions of sweet silent thought
    I summon up remembrance of things past,
    I sigh the lack of many a thing I sought,
    And with old woes new wail my dear time’s waste.
    Then can I drown an eye unused to flow,
    For precious friends hid in death’s dateless night,
    And weep afresh love’s long since cancelled woe,
    And moan th’ expense of many a vanished sight.
    Then can I grieve at grievances foregone,
    And heavily from woe to woe tell o’er
    The sad account of fore-bemoanèd moan,
    Which I new pay as if not paid before.
      But if the while I think on thee, dear friend,
      All losses are restored, and sorrows end.
    I chose sonnet 30 from Shakespeare because it really called my attention and made me reflect. The speaker in this poem seem very sad and depressed. He describes his feelings when the past comes to his mind and how these things affected him. I think it is very effective because he remembers his friends that have already died and he mentions his emotions when remembering this kind of stuff. But I think that the most effective part is at the end: “But if the while I think on thee, dear friend,/All losses are restored, and sorrows end.” These two lines express that all these terrible feeling and pain the speaker got goes away when he remembers of his dear friend. I think this passage shows that when remembering of someone that you have loved, all this pain goes away because you may remember the good moments you lived with that person and forget about what caused you such pain.

  14. chic12mt says:

    1) Between both of the different styles I personally felt more connected to the modern sonnets. The traditional sonnets written by Shakespeare are more ambiguous, the meaning is still in the air, meanwhile the modern sonnets are more direct, I understood everything they were saying, or at leat the major part of it. To fully understand one of the traditional sonnets I feel like you should know beforehand Shakespearean language, and understand how shakespeare plays with words, meanwhile the other one explains and gives you exactly what you want, letting you enjoy it.

    2) Both of the Shakespearean sonnets are quite similar in some aspects, both talk about love, and about a girl, the main difference is the way in how Shakespeare is expressing both of these loves; in the first one, Shakespeare talks about a girl, he expresses his love for her in such a beautiful way, he lets the audience know how beautiful this girl was and how strong his love was for her. The second sonnet also talks about a girl, but the difference is that in this one I feel like the love is more real, and natural; Shakespeare in this one is always saying how he can’t compare the girl with any of the things that usually people come things with, I feel that hat Shakespeare wanted to ay with that is not that the girl was horrible but he still loved but that the girl was beautiful in her own way and how comparing her with other things would be totally impossible.

    3) The sonnet that I found more effective was the sonnet 130, maybe because of the way that Shakespeare expresses his love for the girl, I feel like the way he does it, the diction he uses make the reader intrigue by the change of pattern. In the sonnet 130, Shakespeare expresses his love in a very unusual way, making it clear that the way he loves the girl exceeds any other love previously known.

    4) Do not stand at my grave and weep
    by Mary Elizabeth Frye

    Do not stand at my grave and weep:
    I am not there; I do not sleep.
    I am a thousand winds that blow,
    I am the diamond glints on snow,
    I am the sun on ripened grain,
    I am the gentle autumn rain.
    When you awaken in the morning’s hush
    I am the swift uplifting rush
    Of quiet birds in circling flight.
    I am the soft starshine at night.
    Do not stand at my grave and cry:
    I am not there; I did not die.

    I choose this poem for the way Frye expresses how death truly is. I don’t know many people that have died, but the only one that I did used to know was someone really closed to me, that is way I felt withdraw to this poem, because I know how it feels to loose someone close to you and at the same time because I think the same way. When someone dies for me that person is still with me, and the body that we bury, that is just a tool that that person used to communicate with ourselves. The imagery is really strong in this poem, you get to imagine the person as wind, flowing, seeing the people visiting her at the grave.

    • chic12mt says:

      Do not stand at my grave and cry:/
      I am not there; I did not die./
      Those two sentences show a very powerful diction, phrases like i’m not there, I did not die makes you wonder the significance of life, and how we don’t actually know what is beyond our understanding, we just imagine what is after death, but at the end of the day we don’t know. Frye is using those words to create a feeling of loneliness and hopeless sense, making the person feel like there is nothing we can’t do about the end but what we can “know” for sure is that anything can happen, and that nothing is written.

  15. 18annah says:

    1. The main differences I noticed between modern and traditional sonnets are the language, rhythm, and appearance. The traditional sonnets have a constant rhythm through out, use more complex vocabulary, and appear to have a specific set up. Shakespeare’s sonnets both look the same in that they have only their last two lines indented, where as the modern sonnets each have an individual appearance. Overall, I prefer the traditional sonnets, because of their rhythmic flow.

    2. My favorite of the traditional sonnets is Sonnet 18, he compares his lover to a summer’s day, and speaks about how perfect every aspect of her is, which although it is exaggerated, and probably not completely true, it is sweet. It is different to sonnet 130 because in that one he describes someone he is in love with, but speaks about both her beauties and worst imperfections, which is a little more realistic, but less romantic.

    3. I like sonnet 18 best out of all the sonnets above because of it sweet comparisons. I think that the cheesiness of it actually makes it even cuter, because although it is not completely realistic, it shows that he can see every aspect of his lover and their flaws in an positive way that is perfection to him. Shakespeare uses descriptive comparisons and imagery in his sonnet, along with a rhythm that makes it flow very smoothly. I like the line, “But thy eternal summer shall not fade,” because since he is comparing his lover to the wonderful aspects of summer, this implies that those comparable beauties will last forever. In addition, the line, “Thou art more lovely and more temperate:” has a specifically smooth rhythm to it, and a very tender meaning to it, saying that his lover is his better, more gentle half.

    4. I chose “Do not stand at my grave and weep” by Mary Elizabeth Frye, because even though it is a more modern sonnet, with simple language. I feel that its basic diction allows the reader to understand the overall meaning easier, and then find his or her own personalized deeper connection. Not only this, but I also like the imagery in each line, such as the fourth line, “I am the diamond glints on snow,” which not only gives clear imagery, but contains a metaphor, in saying that the sparking parts of snow are diamond glints. I also think that the fact that there is repetition in it saying she/the person that is not there is each of these thing that occur constantly in your everyday life appears very mystical. I like that it seems as though the to have been written by a dead person until the last line. The last line, which is my favorite line states that, “I am not there; I did not die.” It adds confusion to the whole rest of the sonnet beforehand, because suddenly the reader doesn’t know what to believe, however, it is good in that it leaves the reader in question.

    Do not stand at my grave and weep
    by Mary Elizabeth Frye

    Do not stand at my grave and weep:
    I am not there; I do not sleep.
    I am a thousand winds that blow,
    I am the diamond glints on snow,
    I am the sun on ripened grain,
    I am the gentle autumn rain.
    When you awaken in the morning’s hush
    I am the swift uplifting rush
    Of quiet birds in circling flight.
    I am the soft starshine at night.
    Do not stand at my grave and cry:
    I am not there; I did not die.

  16. Xiwen Wang (Steven) says:

    1) There is a lot of differences between the Shakespeare sonnet and the modern sonnet. There is difference between the rhyme, style, and language. I believe that the most important difference between these sonnets are the usage and application of language in the sonnets. Because it cause a noticeable difference, Shakespeare’s sonnets have much more complicated language than the modern ones: it causes a poetic feeling for me (or maybe that I’m just too bad at understanding sonnets). And by the modern sonnets it’s more clear to me. I prefer more the Shakespeare ones, although it’s hard to understand for me but the rhymes are more fluent.

    2) Both sonnet 18 and 130 are a description of a female character. Descriptions used in sonnet 13 are more about the beauty of the female character while in the sonnet 130 it is totally different. I believe the method used is similar in both sonnets.I prefer more sonnet 18 because the rich imagery contained in the sonnet and also the diction which have been used throughout the text. It is about how a man describes his lover and comparing her to some natural elements. To make her stand out and unique.

    3)I believe that the sonnet 130 is more effective in comparison to other sonnets. Not only because it sounds kind of ironic but also because the vivid descriptions about the female character, from the first lines of the sonnet, My mistress’ eyes are nothing like the sun/Coral is far more red than her lips’ red; there is a imagery, metaphor and it also seem like that the author is trying to insult someone, but after reading the other lines such as, And in some perfumes is there more delight/Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks./I love to hear her speak, yet well I know/That music hath a far more pleasing sound; in these lines there is multisensory imagery, and it gives me an expression of love because people ignore all the bad characteristics and habits that the other person has.

    4) Sonnet 73
    That time of year thou mayst in me behold
    When yellow leaves, or none, or few, do hang
    Upon those boughs which shake against the cold,
    Bare ruined choirs, where late the sweet birds sang.
    In me thou seest the twilight of such day
    As after sunset fadeth in the west,
    Which by and by black night doth take away,
    Death’s second self, that seals up all in rest.
    In me thou seest the glowing of such fire
    That on the ashes of his youth doth lie,
    As the deathbed whereon it must expire
    Consumed with that which it was nourished by.
      This thou perceiv’st, which makes thy love more strong,
      To love that well which thou must leave ere long.
    The rhymes of this sonnet is in the form of ABAB, In the sonnet there is imagery for autumn leaves which can be a metaphor of the remainder time of his own life. Most of the imagery in the poem suggest the death, but the author himself does not know how close he is to death, he expressed the idea in the second and third line. “When yellow leaves, or none, or few, do hang/Upon those boughs which shake against the cold,”

  17. Harry says:

    In these two types of sonnets, the ones I like the most are the traditional sonnets. The traditional sonnets flows more fluently and have great imagery and diction, it’s harder to understand but it gives a different feeling (in my opinion a more poetic feeling) to the readers. In the other hand, the modern sonnets are easier to understand and more straight forward.

    It’s really difficult to find a sonnet that I prefer in these Shakespearean sonnets, but overall I like Sonnet 130. He is saying that his beloved one is not like the ones that poets describe in their poems, but she is still as beautiful and special to him. One of the sonnets is praising the girl and the other sonnet is comparing the girl.

    I would probably choose Sonnet 18, because of how he limns the girl in his poem. I like poems with imagery, and this is a poem that I would choose for showing imagery. Also, in this sonnet, diction is used wisely, he is praises the girl and compare her to the summer, although I feel like that summer shouldn’t be a word to describe a girl, but this poem changes my mind with the diction it has.

    The poem “America” by Claude McKay
    Although she feeds me bread of bitterness,
    And sinks into my throat her tiger’s tooth,
    Stealing my breath of life, I will confess
    I love this cultured hell that tests my youth.
    Her vigor flows like tides into my blood,
    Giving me strength erect against her hate,
    Her bigness sweeps my being like a flood.
    Yet, as a rebel fronts a king in state,
    I stand within her walls with not a shred
    Of terror, malice, not a word of jeer.
    Darkly I gaze into the days ahead,
    And see her might and granite wonders there,
    Beneath the touch of Time’s unerring hand,
    Like priceless treasures sinking in the sand.
    Personification is used well in this poem, the poet personifies USA using dedicated words. In this poem, the readers can see the diction being used in the poem to show his love and hate towards USA. “I love this cultured hell that tests my youth.” this line has a little bit of parallelism because it uses the words cultured hell, because no one would think that hell would be cultured and the only cultured place is earth. The poet is saying that even though USA is a challenging country to him, but he still loves the country.

  18. 18aliciangc says:

    The difference between the modern and traditional sonnets is the use of words like Shakespeare’s sonnets compared to the modern sonnets have more of a complex language. I believe that the traditional sonnets have a better-composed structure because when the reader reads it, it sounds more poetic and smooth. The modern sonnets don’t have the effect and it doesn’t flow like the traditional sonnets. I prefer the style of Shakespeare so the traditional one because it more captivating like the rhymes just flow throughout the sonnet and the reader will never know the exact message from it.

    The difference between the two Shakespeare’s sonnet is that “Shakespeare: Sonnet 18” contradicts with “Shakespeare: Sonnet 130” because the first sonnets talk about the beauty of a woman that he loves, while the second sonnet talks about the bad features of a mistress. I like the “Sonnet 18” more than the other one because it gives a great and clear imagery. Also, is more unique compared to the first one since many sonnets talk about the beauty of their lovers and not bad things about other people features.

    I will still choose “Sonnet 130” to be the one that I found to be most effective because of it’s imagery, rhymes, and irony. I find it ironic how Shakespeare describes the mistress pretty for a second and then ugly like the line “I love to hear her speak, yet well I know/ that music hath a far more pleasing sound;” The exaggerated comparison between objects to her features just gives the reader a great imagery like, “Coral is far more red than her lips’ red;” Overall, I like this sonnet out of the four because it has a different theme compared to the others like the other three sonnets talk about their love towards something, while this one doesn’t it.

    Sweet Rose of Virtue
    by William Dunbar [1460-1525]
    loose translation by Michael R. Burch

    Sweet rose of virtue and of gentleness,
    delightful lily of youthful wantonness,
    richest in bounty and in beauty clear
    and in every virtue that is held most dear―
    except only that you are merciless.

    Into your garden, today, I followed you;
    there I saw flowers of freshest hue,
    both white and red, delightful to see,
    and wholesome herbs, waving resplendently―
    yet nowhere, one leaf or flower of rue.

    I fear that March with his last arctic blast
    has slain my fair rose of pallid and gentle cast,
    whose piteous death does my heart such pain
    that, if I could, I would compose her roots again―
    so comforting her bowering leaves have been.

    This poem talks about a bittersweet love and I choose this one because it has great diction and imagery like, “there I saw flowers of freshest hue,/both white and red, delightful to see,/and wholesome herbs, waving resplendently―/ yet nowhere, one leaf or flower of rue. “ In this line, the word “rue” tells the audience of his bittersweet love because he talks about the loveliness from the flower to the regrets he has. The imagery, “both white and red, delightful to see,/and wholesome herbs, waving resplendently―/” gives the reader to imagine the true beauty of it. In the last verse, the poet talks about his emotion towards it. Overall, this poem has a great symbolism because the flower is talking about his lover.

  19. 18allysonm says:

    1) There is clearly a difference between modern and traditional sonnets although i liked both, Shakespeare sonnet 18 i loved it the way he uses objects to describe his feelings is amazing, modern poems are more easy to understand talking about the words but I really liked both types of sonnets and there is a deep meaning in every of them

    2)I think im going to chose traditional sonnets because I think Shakespeare diction and how he describes everything in such a different way that others would describe and write its wonderful, Shakespeare writing is unique and I think no one is going to get to his level of greatness, he is just too good and the work that he left us is going to be remarkable for a very very long time

    3) Sonnet 18 was the one that really got my attention it is so meaningful and I read like 4 times and it took me the fifth time to understand that he was using objects to describe how he was feeling and I loved that, everyone says that “Shakespeare language” its so hard to understand and boring including me but when you get deep into the text or whatever you are reading of him its wonderful and the diction its so amazing although there are words that I don’t understand but still its really effective.

    4) I chose “London, 1802” the diction was just amazing and all the sonnet was really effective the poem seems to be at a war or something and they were asking for freedom I think maybe that’s the meaning or it can have others but In general the sonnet was really good and enjoyable to read
    “inward happiness. We are selfish men;
    Oh! raise us up, return to us again;
    And give us manners, virtue, freedom, power.

    This part of the sonnet was the one that got my attention and gave me an idea of what it could be about the section and the use exclamation marks seems like they’re demanding something with angriness and it makes the sonnet more interesting and wanting to read more.

  20. 18leonardop says:

    1. The modern sonnets differ a lot from the traditional ones. I felt that the traditional sonnets seem to be more structured, strictly following the many rules that define a “sonnet” itself. In the other hand, the modern sonnets didn’t really seem to be very engaging or organized since it didn’t use iambic pentameter that well, causing the meter in the sonnet to be a little poor.
    Due to this, the poem’s overall rhythmic structure didn’t really have rhythm to it, and this effected the poem significantly. The whole idea of a sonnet, which is to use a structured and captivating rhythm to create an indelible and alluring poem, wasn’t really put into the new sonnets. I also noticed how the modern poems didn’t really use rhyming couplets, which I classify as being the essential thing to create an appealing rhyme.

    2. The two poems contrast each other, as one utilizes romantic diction to describe his mistress’s charming aspects as well as eccentricities, while the other one seems to talk about the abhorrent features that his mistress have, while using a great deal of repulsive imagery, which makes the sonnet itself quite humorous. The audience in both sonnets are also quite different, as one sonnet is directed to his “mistress”, while the other uses dramatic irony to talk about how his mistress is simply repugnant.

    3. I preferred Shakespeare’s 130th sonnet because it utilizes a vivid and engaging imagery which plays with the reader’s senses. I also liked how the sonnet had an extended metaphor throughout its lines, and also the sure amount of juxtaposition used in many lines such as: “I love to hear her speak, yet well I know / That music hath a far more pleasing sound;”, giving the reader a humorous and well-written line of poetry.

    4. I read Shakespeare’s first sonnet and I must say that I was very impressed. I particularly liked how he used descriptive adjectives and an incredible language. His line, “Feed’st thy light’s flame with self-substantial fuel, Making a famine where abundance lies” is simply amazing, employing a lot of imagery. The other line I also thought to be quite effective and impactful was, “Pity the world, or else this glutton be, to eat the world’s due, by the grave and thee.”, as I thought it really talks about how we should be less insensible and “hate” everything around us.

    • Jess Barga says:

      Leo, good comments here—but note that all four of the sonnets, including the modern, use perfect rhyme in the closing couplets (“hell/well”, “hand/sand” as well as “see/thee” and “rare/compare”).

  21. XimenaM says:

    Sonnets are poem that have 14 lines and they all rhyme and have even a meter. This four poems were a clear example of what sonnets are.
    1. This makes clear to me that there is bigger differences between modern and the older (traditional) sonnets. I find the traditional ones more effective and more interesting, I think the modern are not that good as the first poems made. The word use are elegant, but for me it is confusing. The word use made the poems sound clear and also made the poems seem more poetic.
    2. Both Shakespearean poems are really complicated but one of the big differences is that one is about a girl and one is not, but they are kind of similar. The two poems use nature to be a dominant theme to describe anything. I personally prefer the second poem because it was ironic and in that poem Shakespeare sees nature and compares it with mistress and with other things too.
    3. My favourite poem out of the 4 I read was definitely the Sonnet 130 by William Shakespeare, one of the big reason is that I like poems that are Ironic, but not only because of that I like that poem. Also because it has comedy in and made me laugh. This poem wasn’t easy to understand, but it was interesting after you understand what it meant. I really liked this poems.
    4. Shakespeare’s “18 sonnet” has a good and vivid description which it makes it to be effective and getting his massage clear and easy to see it. I really liked this poem, but not like the first one that I had for Shakespeare. I enjoyed reading the traditional and modern poem and seeing the deferences.
    Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?
    Thou art more lovely and more temperate:
    Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
    And summer’s lease hath all too short a date;
    Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
    And often is his gold complexion dimm’d;
    And every fair from fair sometime declines,
    By chance or nature’s changing course untrimm’d;
    But thy eternal summer shall not fade,
    Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow’st;
    Nor shall death brag thou wander’st in his shade,
    When in eternal lines to time thou grow’st:
    So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,
    So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.

  22. 18emilyb says:

    The most noticeable difference between modern and Shakespeare’s sonnets is the language. Even though Shakespeare writes with more complicated language and syntax I think it worked better for these sonnets. I didn’t like the modern sonnets as much because they just didn’t flow like the Shakespeare ones did.

    Sonnet 18 is about a girl who is described as more beautiful than anything else in the world and will forever be like that. Sonnet 130 says that they aren’t perfect or as beautiful as many things and that anyone who says so is lying. I prefer Sonnet 130 because it opposes the kinds of things that are said in Sonnet 18. So many poems describe people in such extraordinary ways and it isn’t real. Sonnet 130 is more truthful.

    I think the most effective sonnet is Sonnet 130. Not only is it the one that made the most sense to me, it also sounded more natural even though the diction is different than modern. It worked better as a whole than the other ones did. I like the lines such as “My mistress’ eyes are nothing like the sun;” because they express disapproval of cliché lines in which, for example, eyes are compared to the sun. Then there is the metaphor of “If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head.” I don’t see black wires as really nice hair and the way it’s said makes it seem plain, further adding to the image of maybe an average looking woman.

    Cicada Cadence
    by Henry George Fischer

    Again the sounds of summer resonate
    As chitinous cicadas, locusts, crickets
    Some stridently, some softly, stridulate
    In hills and valleys, meadows, woods and thickets.

    They’re here, those ambient gambists, each astride
    A twig or leaf or swaying blade of grass,
    And mesmerize our dozing ears, misguide
    Us into thinking none of this will pass—

    A notion the nocturnal croaking caucus
    Of katydids denies, whose farthest cry
    By day’s outdone in August by the raucous
    Buzzing of the dogday harvest fly,

    Ripsawing inspissated heat, portending,
    In its crescendo, an inevitable ending.

    The more I look at this sonnet the more I like it. The enumeration and alliteration in the first stanza is very effective imagery. I especially like the line “Some stridently, some softly, stridulate” which describes the different rhythms of some of the noisemaking insects. The overall message of the poem is also very interesting. It’s about thinking that something will never end, but it does. The last two lines are my favorite as they could probably apply to several situations. I think that there are many things that thicken or intensify right before they end.

    • Jess Barga says:

      Wow, Emily, thanks for introducing me to a sonnet I’d never seen, but really like. I’m going to send it to my mom right now (there are many cicadas in southern Ohio where I’m from).

  23. danielaj25 says:

    1) It’s hard to say that there are that many differences between the modern and traditional sonnets. The two modern sonnets are very different, the first one sounding quite similar to the traditional ones, while the second is a bit more accessible. I still think I really prefer the traditional ones. I feel that, since we can’t know what they mean for sure, there is more to get out of them, and that one can debate more about the meaning of them, which I love.

    2) The first Shakespearian poem is a love poem, about a beautiful woman whom the person speaking loves, while the second is the opposite. I especially enjoyed the second one, and I think it might even be one of the best poems that we have read yet. I find it’s positive negativity compelling and a good kind of eerie. It’s like a very twisted darkness, one that haunts you and hypnotizes you, as if calling to you.

    3) I’ll have to say that my favorite sonnet was Shakespeare’s Sonnet 130, as I mentioned earlier. It uses juxtaposition in incredible ways, making his mistress seem even uglier than she probably is. The diction is also juxtaposed, as show in the line “And in some perfumes is there more delight / Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks”. The word ‘reeks’ evokes a large amount of disgusting olfactory imagery, completely contrasting the earlier term ‘delight’. The line that most appealed to me was probably “I love to hear her speak, yet well I know / That music hath a far more pleasing sound”, because I find it quite funny and at the same time ironic. I don’t really think that the person speaking actually likes to hear her voice, he’s just saying that because it’s his mistress.

    4) Even though I’m not exactly sure this is a true Sonnet (it has 12 lines), I absolutely love it’s meaning and the way it’s told.
    Do not stand at my grave and weep:
    I am not there; I do not sleep.
    I am a thousand winds that blow,
    I am the diamond glints on snow,
    I am the sun on ripened grain,
    I am the gentle autumn rain.
    When you awaken in the morning’s hush
    I am the swift uplifting rush
    Of quiet birds in circling flight.
    I am the soft starshine at night.
    Do not stand at my grave and cry:
    I am not there; I did not die.
    I love the meaning of this poem, especially since I’m someone who doesn’t really get the point of funerals and things like that. Would the person who passed away really want you to cry for them? I wouldn’t. And I feel like this poem is able to encompass that idea fully. It instead talks about how they did not die, “I am not there; I did not die”, in which I also believe. Not as a religious belief, no, more as a metaphorical personal belief. I think that the things you do while you’re alive will always stay in the world no matter what. Even if nobody knows about them, it doesn’t matter. Maybe if you hadn’t stepped on a certain twig and killed a certain animal, that animal would have turned up with a deadly disease that would kill everyone, you never know. I also really enjoyed the imagery in this poem, and the metaphors. The line “I am not there; I do not sleep” also plants a nice thought in my mind, and an image of the person’s spirit floating around. It shows that this person isn’t superficial, and that the body is just a tool that we have to work with, instead of part of us.

  24. 18marianas says:

    1. There are clear and obvious differences between the modern and traditional sonnets. I find the traditional ones more compelling and effective since the diction and use of words add to the elegant and formal ‘mood’ of the topic (and makes it more poetic). On the other hand, modern texts are less vague and more clear to the reader (the vocabulary is also very different, due to time differences).

    2. The sonnets plots are very different due to the fact that one compliments a mistress and the other one demeans a woman. Besides that, the method and diction are similar. I preferred Sonnet 130 because it was ironic, since Shakespeare relates the mistress to beautifal natural elements, but seems to point out the worst in it, and insult her repetitively (making it comical, as well).

    3. My favorite poem out of the list is definitely Sonnet 130, not only because it is funny but Shakespeare seems to be mocking cheesy writers and using their own words against them b creating a terrible description of the mistress. One example is, “I grant I never saw a goddess go; / My mistress, when she walks, treads on the ground.” He mentions how he has never seen a goddess walk, and mentions how the mistress walks very ungracefully as she “treads on the ground”. Another example is, “My mistress’ eyes are nothing like the sun;/Coral is far more red than her lips’ red;” clearly stating how her eyes are dull and lips are pale and uninviting.

    4. Despite the fact that I didn’t seem to catch up on the deeper meaning of the sonnet, I still enjoyed it. I loved how Shakespeare compared objects and his feelings and how easily he seems to be able to write down and express his emotions. I particularly enjoyed “Desire is death, why physic did except” and “Who art as black as Hell, as dark as night”. Shakespeare seems t be going through some sort of heartbreak.
    “My love is as a fever, longing still
    For that which longer nurseth the disease,
    Feeding on that which doth preserve the ill,
    The uncertain sickly appetite to please.
    My reason, the physician to my love,
    Angry that his prescriptions are not kept,
    Hath left me, and I desperate now approve
    Desire is death, which physic did except.
    Past cure I am, now reason is past care,
    And frantic-mad with evermore unrest.
    My thoughts and my discourse as madmen’s are,
    At random from the truth vainly expressed,
    For I have sworn thee fair, and thought thee bright,
    Who art as black as Hell, as dark as night.”

  25. fredrik21 says:

    1.I thought both styles were good at different things. I thought Shakespear’s traditional poem was more effective and compassionate while the more modern style I had more of an connection and is less straight forward then Shakespears sonnets

    2.One is about a girl and one is not i think that is the biggest difference, but there are many similarities. They both are very descriptive and use nature as a base to describe things. I prefer the second one because of how vivid it is and how it describes her.

    3.I liked the poem “America” the most because of the descriptions like “I love this cultured hell that tests my youth”. I love how this poem is about a country because then I can understand it better and infer what he is saying about his own country. For example:Although she feeds me bread of bitterness, And sinks into my throat her tiger’s tooth,”. I think what he is trying to say is no matter how much trouble he has had with his country, he will still stand tall and be proud to be American no matter how much trouble he has to go through.

    4.Shakepear’s “18 sonnet” has a lot of vivid description which makes it effective in getting its message through and overall increasing the quality of the poem. For example: “Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May”. Here Shakespear is comparing the girl to rough winds which means that she is probably a outgoing girl. It also has some hidden meaning as Shakespear always has here:”But thy eternal summer shall not fade”. He is comparing her to the summer(which usually doesn’t last year round),but with her he is in summer all year round.

  26. Andrew Wang says:

    The more modern sonnets were different from the traditional sonnets as they employ near rhymes while the traditional sonnets have actual rhyme in them. While in Claude McKay’s America there is rhyme there also are near rhymes in the poem. Shakespeare sticks to rhyme throughout his sonnets. I’m not sure whether this is true or not but I believe that the more modern poems don’t follow iambic pentameter as strictly as the more traditional ones. I personally prefer the original ones as they feel more organized to me and when read aloud the traditional ones were easier to read. The two sonnets by Shakespeare are also quite different. The first one compliments a person while the second one bashes the mistress being talked about. I personally prefer the second one because even if it is insulting someone the speaker admits their true love for them. I prefer this poem over all of the sonnets as well. I find that the juxtaposition between the insults and the final lines which reveal the speakers true love to be very effective. The sarcasm used in the lines “I love to hear her speak, yet well I know / That music hath a far more pleasing sound;” was quite humorous. The comparisons between objects and the mistress are a good example of juxtaposition, one line which contains this is “If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head.” which compares wires, presumably some kind of golden wires to the hair of the mistress which according to the speaker is a tangled mess. Shakespeare’s 33rd sonnet was also quite good. The juxtaposition between the first quatrain and the second quatrain was quite effective. The extended metaphor throughout the poem was also very effective comparing the sun and the clouds to one’s hopes and the events that crush these hopes. The line “Suns of the world may stain, when heaven’s sun staineth.” was a line which I enjoyed and found effective by solidifying the extended metaphor. The last line of the first quatrain “Gilding pale streams with heavenly alchemy:” is juxtaposed quite well with the first two lines of the second quatrain: “Anon permit the basest clouds to ride, / With ugly rack on his celestial face,”. These lines set up a contrast between the “happiness” represented by the sun and the “sadness” represented by the clouds which is later used in the metaphor.

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